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389 Results
Students from the D.C. Interns program (2022 cohort) pose with the U.S. capitol in the background
Rice Students Tackle Today’s Public Policy Challenges
From urban revitalization in Houston’s Third Ward to displacement due to climate change in East Africa, students are engaging with a broad range of policy topics at the Baker Institute this fall through internships and the Baker Institute Student Forum.
September 28, 2022
Textured flags of America and Mexico
What’s up with the USMCA and Mexico’s Energy Policy?
Despite U.S. officials’ attempts to persuade Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to change course on his energy policy, which violates key provisions of the USMCA, his administration has not backed down, the authors write. They explain where the disputes between the U.S. and Mexico currently stand and what they mean for other aspects of the binational relationship.
Miriam Grunstein, Tony Payan September 14, 2022
Mexican Military
Walks Like a Junta, Looks Like a Junta, Must be a Military Junta ... in Mexico
Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is about to achieve the quiet but full militarization of Mexican society by placing all armed government forces under Defense Secretariat command, writes nonresident fellow Gary Hale. If he is successful, this could lay the groundwork for his possible extended tenure, even if it creates a military junta by subterfuge.
Gary J. Hale September 12, 2022
Tower Power
Mexico’s Energy Self-sufficiency: A Work in Progress or a Pipe Dream?
Although Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is confident that measures implemented in the first half of his tenure will help Mexico to achieve energy self-sufficiency, his optimism must be weighed against the evidence, writes nonresident scholar Adrian Duhalt. In this brief, Duhalt explains the flaws in López Obrador’s plan and why Mexico is unlikely to achieve energy self-sufficiency anytime soon.
Adrian Duhalt August 23, 2022
Border
U.S. Citizens in Mexico: Displaced Without Protection
Among the U.S. citizens migrating to Mexico in recent years are an unknown number of Americans who married Mexican citizens and were co-deported or departed voluntarily with their undocumented spouses, the authors report. Without improved consular services and a diaspora policy that anticipates the likely return of these Americans in the future, the authors worry that the United States risks re-inheriting a sizable U.S. population that may well require critical government services to reintegrate after a prolonged period abroad.
Tran Dang, Abigail Thornton August 4, 2022