• -
47 Results
Gas Graphic
The Art of the Deal … in Arabic
Though the OPEC+ group has agreed to accelerate planned oil production increases, the move will likely do little to reduce prices at the pump, despite a major U.S. concession, writes author Mark Finley — and Russia appears to support the plan. Read more on the Baker Institute Blog.   This article originally appeared in the Forbes blog on June 6, 2022.
Mark Finley June 6, 2022
Map of Middle East.
Key Middle East Policy Issues for the Biden Administration
This brief explores pressing issues the Biden administration should address in developing a strategy for the Middle East. It provides analysis and policy recommendations related to the GCC states, U.S.-Iran relations, Islamist groups, and refugees and migration. Further CME publications will address issues such as the prospects for Israeli-Palestinian peace and the crisis in Lebanon.
Kelsey Norman, A.Kadir Yildirim, Kristian Coates Ulrichsen, Mohammad Ayatollahi Tabaar March 17, 2021
Oil drums
The Case of the Gulf Cooperation Council
Governments in the Gulf Cooperation Council have used oil revenues to provide infrastructure to promote welfare, such as health care, education and public sector jobs, writes the author. This working paper is part of a series titled “The Role of Foreign Direct Investment in Resource-Rich Regions.”
Paul Stevens February 24, 2020
Oil drums
Role of Foreign Direct Investment in Resource-Rich Regions
Indigenous natural resource wealth can provide a basis for robust economic development and broad macroeconomic development, especially when there is appropriate governance and robust legal and regulatory institutions. But a lack of institutional fortitude in many regions around the world has contributed to failure to translate resource wealth into broader macroeconomic wealth.
October 1, 2019
Satellite image of Persian Gulf
Capstone Conference Report: Building Pluralistic and Inclusive States Post-Arab Spring
On Sept. 13, 2018, Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and George Washington University’s Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS) co-hosted the conference “Building Inclusive and Pluralistic States Post-Arab Spring.” The conference was the culmination of a two-year project funded by the Carnegie Corporation and showcased research by leading scholars of the Middle East on political, economic and socio-religious inclusion in Arab states since 2011. This report addresses some of the conference’s key conclusions and policy recommendations for U.S. policymakers concerned with the future stability of the Middle East.
Colton Cox December 18, 2018