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106 Results
Oil pipelines.
Winning the Long War in Ukraine Requires Gas Geoeconomics
Proactive U.S. efforts to enhance Europe’s gas security and blunt Russia’s ability to use gas for hybrid warfare would directly support its ability to sustain and upgrade its combat credibility in East and Southeast Asia. By incentivizing upstream gas investments globally through the demand call associated with a broader European move to replace Russian gas with LNG, gas geoeconomics would over the medium term also help increase global LNG supply to the ultimate benefit of U.S. allies in Asia, foremost among them Japan and South Korea.
Gabriel Collins, Anna Mikulska, Steven R. Miles August 4, 2022
Power lines during a freeze.
ERCOT Froze in February 2021. What Happened? Why Did It Happen? Can It Happen Again?
The authors conduct a step-by-step examination of various factors that were blamed for the extended power outage on the ERCOT electricity grid in February 2021. While no single factor fully explains the calamity, the bureaucratic failure in identifying and addressing risks along fuel supply chains was a major failure. Most proposed remedies do not fundamentally address what occurred. The authors make several recommendations, some of which have already been implemented.
Peter Hartley, Kenneth B. Medlock III, Shih Yu (Elsie) Hung February 2, 2022
Global market trends
The Economic Effects of Proposed Changes to the Tax Treatment of Capital Gains
In this working paper, the author examines the economic effects of enacting a proposal by the Biden administration to tax long term capital gains at ordinary income tax rates for those with taxable income above $1 million and tax unrealized gains at the time of death for single (joint) filers with more than $1 million ($2 million) in unrealized gains. A similar version of the report was prepared with the financial support of the Center for Freedom and Prosperity Foundation.
John W. Diamond October 27, 2021
Texas refineries at sunset.
Expanding Carbon Capture in Texas: Working Paper from Stakeholder Discussions on “Collaborative Action to Reduce CO2 Emissions in Texas”
Texas is the source of about one-quarter of all energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the US industrial sector and about one-eighth of all CO2 emissions from the US power generation sector, with a significant proportion of emissions in both sectors located near the gulf coast. As such, Texas has the opportunity to capture significant economies of scale in carbon capture.
Kenneth B. Medlock III, Keily Miller January 27, 2021