Impunity, Corruption and the Rule of Law in Mexico

The rule of law is the principle that clear and legitimate laws should govern a nation — and that all persons and institutions, including the government itself, should be accountable to the law, which must be fairly applied and enforced. Unfortunately, well into the 21st century, many nations still lag behind in abiding by this principle. Mexico, in spite of enormous strides in its economic and political life, is not an exception. The country faces vast challenges to the rule of law as it seeks to implement groundbreaking constitutional reforms. Issues yet to be fully addressed are related to weak constraints on government power, corruption, order and security, respect for fundamental human rights and due process, government transparency and openness, regulatory enforcement, impunity, civil and criminal justice, and freedom of the press. The next slate of reforms must focus on the rule of law if Mexico is to move into the ranks of developed nations.

In this panel, three experts will discuss their research findings and activism on impunity, corruption and other leading indicators of the challenges still ahead for the rule of law and a culture of lawfulness in Mexico.

This event is sponsored by the Baker Institute Mexico Center.

Join the conversation online with #BakerMexico.



Eduardo Bohórquez
Executive Director, Transparencia Mexicana

Juan Antonio Le Clercq
Director, Center for the Study of Impunity and Justice, and Academic Director, International Relations and Political Science, Universidad de las Américas, Puebla (UDLAP)

Alejandro Ponce, Ph.D.
Chief Research Officer, World Justice Project


Tony Payan, Ph.D.
Françoise and Edward Djerejian Fellow for Mexico Studies and Director, Mexico Center, Baker Institute


Group(s): Mexico Center


Thu, Nov. 10, 2016
6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central


James A. Baker III Hall, Rice University
6100 Main St.
Houston, Texas 77005

Kelly International Conference Center