The Shale Revolution: What Do We Know and Where Are We Going?

In a major study funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Center for Energy Studies (CES) at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy assessed the local and global market impacts of proposed and potential policy actions on the development of shale resources in North America. The study, titled "The Market Impacts of New Natural Gas-Directed Policies in the United States," was published by the Baker Institute in February 2015. The Sloan Foundation has also funded numerous research projects at other institutions in order to contribute to the deeper understanding of the shale resource base and its longer-term potential impacts.

The Center for Energy Studies hosted a conference on Oct. 30, 2014, to discuss the shale revolution. The conference featured speakers from the Center for Energy Studies, The University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, Resources for the Future, the Environmental Defense Fund, the University of Colorado Denver, Duke University and Rice University. The speakers presented the latest research on characterizing shale resources and recovery, the environmental impacts of shale development, public perception and policy motivation in different parts of the country, and the economic implications of shale development and associated policy interventions.

Scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the videos from the event. To view the full program for the conference, click here.

 

Agenda

8:30 am    

Registration and Breakfast

9:00 am    

Welcome and Study Design

Kenneth B. Medlock III, Ph.D.
James A. Baker, III, and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics, and Senior Director, Center for Energy Studies, Baker Institute

     

Resources and Recovery

 9:15 am    

“The Role of Shale Gas in the U.S. Energy Transition: Recoverable Resources, Production Rates and Implications”

Overview and Geology
Scott W. Tinker, Ph.D.
Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, and Allday Endowed Chair of Subsurface Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin; and State Geologist of Texas

Well EUR and Technically Recoverable Reserves
John Browning
Senior Research Fellow, Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin

Well Economics and Production Outlook
Svetlana Ikonnikova, Ph.D.
Research Associate and Energy Economist, Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin

Sensitivities and Economic Differences
Gürcan Gülen, Ph.D.
Senior Energy Economist, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin

10:45 am    

Coffee Break

     

Environmental Impacts

11:00 am    

“Risks and Regulations of Pits and Tanks”
Alan Krupnick, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Energy Economics and Policy, Resources for the Future

Noon    

Lunch

 1:00 pm    

“EDF’s Scientific Efforts to Quantify Natural Gas Methane Leakage”
David Lyon
Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund

     

Policy and Public Sentiment

 2:00 pm    

“Understanding the Political Fractures and Seams Around Hydraulic Fracturing in Texas”

Tanya Heikkila, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director, Doctoral Program, School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver

Samuel Gallaher
Ph.D. Candidate, School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver

 2:30 pm    

“Policy Outcomes and Political Venues: The Case of Hydraulic Fracturing”

Robert Stein, Ph.D.
Fellow in Urban Politics, Baker Institute; and Lena Gohlman Fox Professor, Department of Political Science, Rice University

Marvin McNeese
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Political Science, Rice University

 3:00 pm    

Coffee Break

     

Economics and Market Response

 3:15 pm    

“Shale Public Finance: Local Government Revenues and Costs Associated with Oil and Gas Development”

Daniel Raimi
Associate in Research, Duke University Energy Initiative

 4:00 pm    

“The Market Impacts of Shale-Directed Policies in the United States”

Kenneth B. Medlock III, Ph.D.
James A. Baker III and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics, and Senior Director, Center for Energy Studies, Baker Institute

 5:00 pm    

Closing Remarks

 5:15 pm    

Reception

 

 

 

 
To view the entire conference, please click below:
 
Session 1: NOT AVAILABLE TO PUBLIC
 

When?

Thu, Oct. 30, 2014
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Where?

James A. Baker III Hall, Rice University
6100 Main St.
Houston, Texas 77005
United States

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