The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom

A riveting history of America"s most beautiful natural resources, "The Quiet World: Saving Alaska's Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960" documents the heroic fight waged by the U.S. government from 1879 to 1960 to save wild Alaska from industrial expansion. Join author Douglas Brinkley, Baker Institute fellow in history and an award-winning historian, on April 20 as he discusses how a colorful band of determined environmentalists created the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, preserving many of Alaska"s great wonders for future generations to enjoy.

Following the program, the institute will unveil a garden bench dedicated to the memories of Stone Weeks and Holt Weeks, two remarkable young brothers who were killed in the summer of 2009. At the time, Stone was the assistant and researcher for Brinkley. Holt was an intern for Chris Bronk, Baker Institute fellow in information technology policy, and had been accepted at Rice as a transfer student. Holt would be graduating this spring. In memory of the brothers, The Stone and Holt Weeks Foundation has been established to provide support to organizations that carry on the spirits of the young men and take action to make the world a better place for all. A reception will follow the dedication.

Group(s): Baker Institute
Speaker Douglas Brinkley
Douglas Brinkley, Ph.D., is the fellow in history at the Baker Institute and a professor of history at Rice University. Brinkley’s most recent publications include “The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America” (2009); “The Reagan Diaries” (2007), which he edited; and the New York Times best-seller “The ...

Douglas Brinkley, Ph.D., is the fellow in history at the Baker Institute and a professor of history at Rice University. Brinkley’s most recent publications include “The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America” (2009); “The Reagan Diaries” (2007), which he edited; and the New York Times best-seller “The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast” (2006), which was the recipient of the Robert F. Kennedy prize and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award.


He is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair, Los Angeles Times Book Review and American Heritage, as well as a frequent contributor to The New York Times, The New Yorker and The Atlantic Monthly. In a recent profile, the Chicago Tribune deemed him “America’s new past master.”


Before coming to Rice, Brinkley served as professor of history and director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization at Tulane University. From 1994 to 2005 he was the Stephen E. Ambrose Professor of History and director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies at the University of New Orleans. While a professor at Hofstra University, Brinkley spearheaded the American Odyssey course, in which he took students on cross-country treks on which they visited historic sites and met seminal figures in politics and literature. He also spent a year teaching history at the U.S. Naval Academy and Princeton University.


Brinkley completed his bachelor’s degree at The Ohio State University and received his doctorate in U.S. diplomatic history from Georgetown University. He has received honorary doctorates from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Trinity College in Hartford, Conn.


Douglas Brinkley

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When?

Wed, April 20, 2011
6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
(GMT-0600) America/Chicago

Where?